Water and Environment

Mapping Water – Special challenges, local solutions

Groundwater mapping

The ability to reveal the availability and movement of water is a huge asset for countries and regions wanting to manage resources and respond to natural disasters.

The SkyTEM method, developed initially to identify and characterize aquifers, is widely accepted globally as the best technique for mapping water resources. Distinct from conventional airborne TDEM systems designed as single purpose sensors that push through the top few hundred metres to detect “bumps” or strong mineral contrasts, SkyTEM is capable of mapping subtle changes between sand, clay, silt, gravel, and tills that define the location and potential vulnerability of aquifers. The Danish Ministry of Environment has to date mapped over one third of the country’s aquifers with SkyTEM. Hydrogeology divisions of governments worldwide routinely select SkyTEM technology over all others to map their water resources. Read more about mapping of buried valleys in Denmark here, and conclusions here.

SkyTEM technology offers digital data that is used for creating detailed 3D geological representations of the subsurface down to 500 metres. These representations can be used for a variety of different applications and is a vital factor for setting up reliable and usable hydrological models in respect to sustainable Water management. SkyTEM Surveys has surveyed around 35% of Denmark’s total area for the purpose of groundwater protection and management.

Read more about the national project on the Geological Survey of Denmark’s website and the HydroGeophysics Group’s website (Aarhus University).

News

SkyTEM launches two new revolutionary helicopter TEM systems

SkyTEM continues to deliver new technological advancements…

Swedish Geological Survey continues to locate groundwater

The Swedish Minister of Trade and Industry, Mikael Damberg, inspected…

SkyTEM mapping groundwater in Surat, India

SkyTEM is currently mapping aquifers for the Surat Municipal…

Airborne geophysical survey of Yellowstone National Park

The United States Geological Survey (USGS), University of…

Water survey in California

California is suffering from drought and lack of drinking water.…

304 to Yuma. SkyTEM technology maps groundwater in Arizona

The SkyTEM304 airborne geophysical system will soon be mapping…

ENWRA continues to employ SkyTEM method to map aquifers

SkyTEM is happy to announce that we are again working with Eastern…

Danish water technology in White House summit

On 22 March Barack Obama invited to the summit “Moonshot…

Danish water alliance to help solve California's water challenges

To make sure California is able to cope with an unprecedented…

SkyTEM survey for groundwater mapping in Botswana

The International Water Management Institute (IWMI) has published…

Publications

Mapping groundwater with SkyTEM - White Paper

The ability to reveal the availability and movement of groundwater…

Mapping Water Resources

The SkyTEM system is an innovative and technologically advanced…

Geoscience BC report from SkyTEM Peace Project survey

Information presented in the report is the result of the Peace…

Report from SkyTEM survey on Gotland in Sweden

 In 2013 the Swedish Geological Survey, SGU, contracted…

Groundwater Mapping in Antarctica with the SkyTEM System - Publication in Nature

A scientific article written by J. A. Mikucki, E. Auken, S.…

SkyTEM101 - A New Airborne Mapping Tool

The SkyTEM101 system was developed for the NiCA project (Nitrate Reduction in a Geologically Heterogeneous Catchment

NiCA SkyTEM101 Survey Report

A report has been published by the Hydrogeophysics Group at Aarhus…

Greater water security with groundwater mapping

Rethink Water & Danish Water Forum have published a white paper on the provision of fresh water and the ambitious groundwater mapping programme in Denmark, which has laid the foundation for the groundwater expertise of Danish companies.

Environmental assessment pollution plume related to groundwater in Ribe, Denmark

From 1956 until 1973, untreated wastewater from a chemical plant was dumped into 6 pits in a plantation in the south-western part of Jutland, Denmark 0.5-1.0 km from the coastline. Today, it is one of the worst pollution scenarios in Denmark with high concentrations of e.g. chlorinated organic solvents.